About Us

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Mission Statement:

Some of medicine's most pressing questions, ranging from diabetes and cancer to sepsis and heart disease, will require a new model of science to deliver the next generation of breakthroughs. The Center for Vascular Biology Research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center unites leading investigators across all the departments and research centers in our institution to transcend age-old barriers to progress. The Center is an incubator for creative approaches to the study of vascular biology. Its members pursue the singular goal of finding new solutions at the intersection of traditionally disparate fields. The Center deploys strategic cores to support the entire pipeline of biomedical research, from basic bench investigation to bedside application. Faculty members at the Center compete for large programmatic support, appealing to both established and emerging stakeholders. The Center trains tomorrow's leaders in life sciences and provides a unique forum for scholarly exchange with the global community. In short, the Center produces the kind of innovation that matters most to our current and future patients.

Governance:

In the fall of 2015, the Center for Vascular Biology adopted a new leadership structure that reflects its multidisciplinary and interdepartmental mission. Dr. Vikas Sukhatme, Chief Academic Officer for the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Dr. Elliot Chaikof, Surgeon-in-Chief and Chair of the Roberta and Stephen R. Weiner Department of Surgery at the BIDMC joined the existing members, Drs. Saffitz, Wolfe and Zeidel, on the Executive Committee. The Executive Committee provides long-term and overarching guidance and strategic planning to the CVBR faculty to achieve the shared vision. Faculty members from each department serve on the Steering Committee, which works closely with the Executive Committee to oversee all of the center's academic activities, faculty recruitment and day-to-day operations. The composition of the current Executive and Steering Committees is listed below.

Executive Committee:


Chaikoff

Elliot L. Chaikof, MD, PhD, is Surgeon-in-Chief and Chairman of Surgery of the Roberta and Stephen R. Weiner Department of Surgery at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Dr. Chaikof is also the Johnson and Johnson Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School. The Department of Surgery comprises 14 divisions and seven multidisciplinary institutes or centers, all of which conduct research in diverse areas. The department's major investigative thrusts include inflammation and immunity, nutrition and metabolism, regenerative therapy, glycoscience, cancer biology and, through the Center for Vascular Biology Research, vascular biology. The department is also home to five interdisciplinary research centers, including the National Center for Functional Glycomics, the Center for Drug Discovery and Translational Research, and the Rongxiang Xu, MD, Center for Regenerative Therapeutics. With research funding last year of over $15 million, the department ranks among the very top academic surgical departments in the nation. Dr. Chaikof's research focuses on drug discovery and tissue engineering with an emphasis on the treatment of cardiovascular disease.

Saffitz

Jeffrey E. Saffitz, MD, PhD, is Chairman of the Department of Pathology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Mallinckrodt Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School. The Department of Pathology comprises a large clinical component, involving both Anatomic and Clinical Pathology. In addition, the Department has a strong research component with investigators located in the Center for Vascular Biology Research and the Center for Life Sciences Building. Investigators have varied interests, including the molecular and cellular mechanisms that are involved in tumor progression, angiogenesis, inflammation, and neuronal and cardiac muscle cell physiology. Ongoing studies are elucidating the molecular mechanisms that regulate the survival, migration, invasion, metastasis, and apoptosis of tumor cells, stromal fibroblasts, endothelial cells and immune cells within the tumor microenvironment. Dr. Saffitz's research is focused on cell-cell communication via gap junctions in the heart.

Sukhatme

Vikas P. Sukhatme, MD, ScD, is Victor J. Aresty Professor of Medicine and Chief Academic Officer for the BIDMC and Harvard Faculty Dean for Academic Programs. He is responsible for oversight of BIDMC's research and education enterprise. His current research interests are in tumor metabolism and tumor immunology and in repurposing drugs for oncology indications.

Wolfe

Richard E. Wolfe, MD, is Chief of Emergency Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. An active clinician and teacher, Dr. Wolfe was previously director of the residency in emergency medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital and served as chair of the Education Committee for the American College of Emergency Physicians. He is currently a member of the Emergency Medicine Connections task force. The Emergency Medicine Department at BIDMC currently supports a strong basic and translational research program in sepsis and endothelial dysfunction at the Center for Vascular Biology Research. Dr. Wolfe's research interests include ultrasound applications in emergency medicine, use of the laboratory in the evaluation of sepsis, and education and structure in postgraduate emergency medicine training.

Zeidel

Mark L. Zeidel, MD, is Physician-in-Chief and Chairman of the Department of Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Herrman Ludwig Blumgart Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. There are 24 Divisions in the Department of Medicine, 11 involving clinical and research activities and 13 that are research-based. The Center for Vascular Biology Research is represented by Principle Investigators from the Divisions of Cardiology, Molecular and Vascular Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine, Nephrology, and Gastroenterology. The Department is recognized nationally for the excellence of its faculty and the magnitude and breadth of its research productivity. In fiscal year 2006, the Department had externally funded research of over $147 million, placing it among the ten best funded Medical School Departments of Medicine in the country. Dr. Zeidel's research interests include epithelial biology and water transport.


Steering Committee:


Harold F. Dvorak MD: Dr. Harold Dvorak served as the founding Director of the CVBR, which was formed in 2004 as part of a strategic plan to establish interdisciplinary centers of excellence at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Dr. Dvorak is internationally recognized for his discovery of the protein now known as Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). This discovery led to the blossoming of numerous areas of vascular biology research, which are still yielding promising advances in the treatment of such illnesses as age-related macular degeneration, cancer and heart disease. The most significant of these to date is the FDA's approval of the anti-angiogenesis drug, Avastin to treat patients with advanced cancer.

Christiane Ferran, MD, PhD: Dr. Ferran is the Thomas Lewis Professor of Surgery at Harvard medical School. She holds a dual appointment in the Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, and the Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, at the BIDMC. She also serves as the co-Director of the Harvard Longwood Training Grant in Vascular Surgery, and is an active member of the Transplant Institute at BIDMC. Dr. Ferran's ongoing research focuses on uncovering the multiple functions of the versatile anti-inflammatory gene A20, and in particular its atheroprotective, hepatoprotective and anti-diabetic effects. Currently, a special emphasis is placed on translational studies aimed at ushering A20-based therapies to the clinic.

Ananth Karumanchi, MD: Dr. Karumanchi is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and an Attending Nephrologist in the Department of Medicine at BIDMC. Dr. Karumanchi also has a secondary appointment as a research scientist in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. His current research focuses on the role of angiogenic growth factors and inhibitors in the pathogenesis of pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia and gestational hypertension. A second focus of research in his laboratory is to elucidate vascular and hormonal mechanisms of uremia related cardiovascular complications.

Jack Lawler, PhD: Dr. Lawler is Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School and Vice-Chair for Research in the Department of Pathology at the BIDMC. He also serves as Co-Director of the Training Grant in Angiogenesis and Inflammation and is the Leader of the Angiogenesis, Invasion and Metastasis Discipline-based Working Group of the Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. Dr. Lawler's current research focuses on the anti-angiogenic activity of the thrombospondins with the goal of developing a novel therapeutic for the treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer.

Nathan I. Shapiro, MD, MPH: Dr. Nathan Shapiro is Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine and Director of Translational Research. As clinician-scientist he maintains active research in both the clinical and translational arena focusing on the diagnosis and treatment of Sepsis with a special emphasis on the endothelial cell responses and microvascular dysfunction. His research heavily incorporates both biomarker diagnostic technologies as well as non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring at the bedside and novel imaging techniques to directly visualize and quantify microcirculatory flow in patients.


History:

The Center for Vascular Biology Research was formed in 2004 as part of a strategic plan to establish interdisciplinary centers of excellence at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Dr. Harold Dvorak (above) served as the founding Director of the CVBR. Dr. William C. Aird, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School know internationally for his contribution in defining concepts of 'endothelial heterogeneity', co-developed the CVBR with Dr. Dvorak, serving as its founding Associate Director. In 2008, Dr. Aird was appointed Director of the CVBR and Dr. Laura Benjamin became the Associate Director. Dr. Benjamin's research focused on the study of molecular mechanisms that regulate vascular morphogenesis and function. In 2009, Dr. Benjamin left the BIDMC to join Eli Lilly and Company. In October of 2008, the CVBR was consolidated under one roof at Research North, 99 Brookline Avenue, where today over 80 faculty members, postdoctoral fellows and students work side by side. In 2015 the governance of the CVBR was restructured to include an expanded Executive Committee and a new Steering Committee (above).


Contact Us:


Administration:

Lydia Moss
Administrative Coordinator
lmoss1@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-0654


Directions:

The Center for Vascular Biology Research
330 Brookline Avenue
Boston, MA 02215


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Subway
MBTA Green Line to Kenmore Station. Walk up Brookline Avenue (toward Fenway Park) to 99 Brookline Avenue (on right).

Bus
M2 Shuttle - Harvard Square, Cambridge . Board bus at Johnston Gate or Lamont Gate. Exit bus in front of at Kenmore Square (see walking directions above).

Car
From Logan Airport
Take Route 1A South through Sumner Tunnel after leaving Logan Airport. Watch for detour signs that periodically direct traffic north before allowing access to Route 1A South. After tunnel, turn right onto I-93 N. Follow I-93 N about 1/4 mile to exit 26 (Cambridge/ Storrow Drive). Keep left at end of ramp and take underpass to Storrow Drive. Follow Storrow Drive approximately 2.5 miles to Kenmore Square exit ( on left). Bear right at end of exit ramp into Kenmore Square. Take leftmost fork at intersection onto Brookline Avenue. Follow Brookline Avenue approximately 0.3 miles to 99 Brooklne Avenue (on right).

From South of Boston
Take I-93 North to Exit 26 (Cambridge/Storrow Drive). Keep left at the end of ramp and take underpass to Storrow Drive. Follow Storrow Drive approximately 2.5 miles to Kenmore Square exit (on left). Bear right at end of exit ramp into Kenmore Square. Take leftmost fork at intersection onto Brookline Avenue. Follow Brookline Avenue approximately 0.3 miles to 99 Brooklne Avenue (on right).

From West of Boston
Take I-90 East (Massachusetts Turnpike) to Exit 18 (Cambridge/Allston). Bear right after toll booth at end of exit ramp. Turn right after lights (before the bridge) onto Storrow Drive. Follow Storrow Drive (about one mile) to Kenmore Square exit. Bear right at end of exit ramp into Kenmore Square. Take leftmost fork at intersection onto Brookline Avenue. Follow Brookline Avenue approximately 0.3 miles to 99 Brooklne Avenue (on right).

From North of Boston
Take I-93 South to Exit 26 (Storrow Drive/North Station). Keep left at end of ramp and take underpass to Storrow Drive. Follow Storrow Drive approximately 2.5 miles to Kenmore Square exit (on left). Bear right at end of exit ramp into Kenmore Square. Take leftmost fork at intersection onto Brookline Avenue. Follow Brookline Avenue approximately 0.3 miles to 99 Brooklne Avenue (on right).